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  • Date: June 10, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki

As a professional Oracle Hyperion EPM infrastructure consultant we have sometimes been stumped by the misbehaving of the Oracle HTP Server (OHS) to WebLogic Managed Servers traffic proxying as deployed within the Oracle Hyperion EPM configuration at clients.  There are occasions in which we just can’t figure out why things aren’t “communicating” like they should.  So, from our little bag of tricks we pull out the old “how to debug the traffic” card and realize that we always forget these simple yet powerful settings.  Hence, the reason I’ve created this blog post!

My memory is going the older I get so after writing and publishing this, I have a place of my own to find these simple steps for those future pesky troubleshooting engagements.

It’s important to note that these procedures will work for Fusion Middleware (FMW) 11g as is embedded and deployed with the oracle Hyperion EPM System 11.1.2.0, 11.1.2.1, 11.1.2.2, 11.1.2.3, and finally 11.1.2.4.  These precures are not applicable for the newly released Oracle Hyperion EPM System 11.2.0 or 11.2.1 as those new versions come with the newer Fusion Middleware (FMW) 12c.  I’ll post another blog with the procedures for that release shortly.

For the context of this blog we are using oracle Hyperion EPM System 11.1.2.4 running on Windows 2012.

Start by creating a target location for the debug logs.  The name is arbitrary just remember wat you called it and where it’s located on the file system as this will be required in the coming steps.

1-Create new directory or folder in Windows
1-Create new directory or folder in Windows

Backup your existing mod_wl_ohs.conf file.  Depending upon which configuration option you selected when deploying the Oracle Hyperion EPM System, this file could be located on the Oracle HTTP Server (OHS) under the config\OHS folder:

C:\Oracle\Middleware\user_projects\<YourInstanceNameHere>\httpConfig\ohs\config\OHS\ohs_component\mod_wl_ohs.conf
2-Standard mod_wl_ohs conf file location
2-Standard mod_wl_ohs conf file location

Or this file could be located under your customized shared EPM folder for the Oracle HTTP Server (OHS) if you chose that option during the Web Server configure task of the config process.  If you’re not sure, take a look at the httpd.conf file for your OHS instance and find the “include section down towards the bottom of the file.  This will give you the currently configured location.  **NOTE** if you have more than one Oracle HTTP Server (OHS) you should confirm on each server this location and ensure they match and point to the same place. If they don’t you need to update each server’s version of the files for context of this blog post.

C:\Oracle\Middleware\user_projects\Foundation1\httpConfig\ohs\config\OHS\ohs_component\httpd.conf
3-Standard OHS httpd conf file location
3-Standard OHS httpd conf file location
include "moduleconf/*.conf"

<VirtualHost *:19000>
    include "//11124-prd/EPMShared/OHS/mod_wl_ohs.conf"
    Include "//11124-prd/EPMShared/OHS/epm_online_help.conf"
    Include "//11124-prd/EPMShared/OHS/epm_rewrite_rules.conf"
    Include "//11124-prd/EPMShared/OHS/epm.conf"
    Include "//11124-prd/EPMShared/OHS/deflate.conf"
</VirtualHost>
4-httpd conf file include section
4-httpd conf file include section

In all of our deployments we use the shared EPM location for the Oracle HTTP Server (OHS) web server configuration task.  This removes the need for us to re-rerun that web server task whenever a change is made to the Oracle Hyperion EPM System software configuration, the OHS files just get updated automatically.

\\<ServerName>\EPMShared\OHS
5-Shared mod_wl_ohs conf file location
5-Shared mod_wl_ohs conf file location

We copied our mod_wl_ohs.conf file to mod_wl_ohs.conf-ORIG:

6-Backup Shared mod_wl_ohs conf file location
6-Backup Shared mod_wl_ohs conf file location

Edit the mod_wl_ohs.conf file to include the OHS logging parameters as required for the WebLogic LocationMatch section of the WebLogic Managed Server you want to debug traffic for.  Note this log will fill up pretty quick so if you are troubleshooting multiple products communication proxy/web traffic, we suggest creating a separate file for each product’s WebLogic LocationMatch for easier analysis.

Add the appropriate Debug and WLLogFile location parameters using the location you created in the first step above.  The file name and extension of the log itself is arbitrary so we just use a snippet of the WebLogic managed Server we are debugging for in the name with a .log extension. The content being recorded is in plain text.

A very informative (and way to wordy) technical reference guide to these parameters can be found on Oracle’s published documentation website:

https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E28280_01/web.1111/e10144/directives.htm#CIHCACHB

Parameters to add/modify:

Debug ON
WLLogFile C:\MyDebugLogs\OHS-CalcMgr.log

Sample section of one Calculation manager product LocationMatch AFTER adding/updating the required Debug and WLLogFile parameters:

<LocationMatch ^/calcmgr>
    SetHandler weblogic-handler
    WeblogicCluster 11124-PRD:8500
    WLIOTimeoutSecs 14400
    Idempotent OFF
    WLSocketTimeoutSecs 600
    Debug ON
    WLLogFile C:\MyDebugLogs\OHS-CalcMgr.log
</LocationMatch>
7-Edit LocationMatch for mod_wl_ohs conf file
7-Edit LocationMatch for mod_wl_ohs conf file

For the updates to take effect you must restart the oracle HTTP Server (OHS) on each server where you are trying to debug traffic from.  Since we are using Windows, we will use the Windows services.msc control panel and perform a restart of the Oracle Process Manager (ohsInstance####) Windows service:

8-Restart Oracle HTTP Server-OHS from Windows Services
8-Restart Oracle HTTP Server-OHS from Windows Services

To test your Debug and WLLogFile settings log into the product you are experiencing issues with and a new Debug log file should be created in the path and with the name you specified in the LocationMatch section for the WLLogFile section.

9-Open Oracle Hyperion EPM Calculation Manager screen
9-Open Oracle Hyperion EPM Calculation Manager screen
10-WLLogFile Debug file output location for Calculation Manager screen
10-WLLogFile Debug file output location for Calculation Manager screen

If you open and take a look at the WLLogFile Debug output, you will now see any info and error messages being sent from the Oracle HTTP Server (OHS) web traffic proxy to the WebLogic Managed Server (in our example Calculation Manager).

11-WLLogFile Debug file output for Calculation Manager screen
11-WLLogFile Debug file output for Calculation Manager screen

Happy debugging!!!

We hope this Oracle Hyperion EPM System technical blog post/article was helpful and as always, we appreciate any and all feedback!  If you need any assistance, please know we are always here 24×7 and would happy to help with your Infrastructure needs!

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Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Foundations 2020 Certified Associate Issued to Joe Malewicki, Jr.

  • Date: Jul 07, 2020
  • Article by: Elysha Daly
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Oracle EPM 11.2.2 Dropped

  • Date: Jun 30, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki
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Blog Details Page

  • Date: June 4, 2020
  • Article by: Robert Barrett

I recently took the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure 2019 Architect Associate exam. There was a question about Load Balancers and I only knew half the answer. I went back after the exam to search for the correct answer but had a really hard time finding it in any of the materials I had been using to study. This includes the videos and the transcripts too. Eventually I found the answer. The question I ran into is similar to the one below.

Which two will occur when a back-end server that is registered with a back end set is marked to drain connections?

A. It forcibly closes all connections to that instance after a timeout period.

B. It keeps the connections to that instance open and attempts to complete any in-flight requests.

C. It disallows new connections to that back-end server.

D. It immediately closes all existing connections to that instance.

E. It redirects the requests to a user-defined error page.

The “two” part is what threw me. I knew the first half of the answer was C. It disallows new connections to that back-end server. But had to guess at the second half. Afterwards, I eventually found a website that directed me to this url: https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/en-us/iaas/Content/Balance/Reference/sessionpersistence.htm

At the bottom of the page I did find this excerpt: “The Load Balancing service considers a server marked drain available for existing persisted sessions. New requests that are not part of an existing persisted session are not sent to that server.”

Based on this piece of information I am led to believe that the correct second half to the question is B. It keeps the connections to that instance open and attempts to complete any in-flight requests. Please feel free to respond to this and let me know your thoughts.

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Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Foundations 2020 Certified Associate Issued to Joe Malewicki, Jr.

  • Date: Jul 07, 2020
  • Article by: Elysha Daly
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Oracle EPM 11.2.2 Dropped

  • Date: Jun 30, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki
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Blog Details Page

  • Date: June 3, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki

Oracle EPM 11.2 does not include the Oracle HTTP server (OHS) startup service we are used to seeing in prior version of the product. This requires us to be more hands-on when starting and stopping the EPM environment. Fortunately, if you use a services start/stop script, you can add commands to ensure the OHS processes and prerequisites are on-line before your Hyperion services are started, and to shut down the OHS and WebLogic processes after the Hyperion services are stopped.

The proper sequence for startup is to first bring up the Oracle WebLogic server:

  • Open a Command Prompt
  • Navigate to <MW_HOME>/user_projects/domains/EPMSystem/bin folder
  • Execute ‘startWeblogic.cmd’ (no quotes)
  • You may be prompted for a password, use the same one you provided when configuring the EPM WebLogic portion of your installation
  • Once WebLogic is started, you may then start the OHS component from a command prompt:
  • cd<ORACLE_EPM_INSTANCE>\httpConfig\ohs\bin
  • startComponent ohs_component
  • You may be prompted for a password, use the same one you provided when configuring the EPM WebLogic portion of your installation

Until Enhancement Request Bug 17694797 HOW TO START OHS 12C AS WINDOWS SERVICE has been completed and released, managing your OHS application processes must be a manual or scripted affair.

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Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Foundations 2020 Certified Associate Issued to Joe Malewicki, Jr.

  • Date: Jul 07, 2020
  • Article by: Elysha Daly
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Oracle EPM 11.2.2 Dropped

  • Date: Jun 30, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki
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Blog Details Page

  • Date: May 26, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki

SSH Key Pairs are required by most Cloud Infrastructure (Infrastructure as a Service) providers for use in authenticating the root or admin level users for various UNIX or Linux compute instances and compute shapes as well as for other IaaS provider management systems (i.e. Amazon Web Services – AWS LightSail, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure – OCI console access, etc…)  The procedures below will walk you through creating your own SSH Key Pair using a Mac OS X operating system.

Launch the terminal.app

macOS Catalina Terminal app located within the "Utilities" folder.
macOS Catalina Terminal app located within the “Utilities” folder.

***NOTE***

Backup any existing SSH Key Pairs you might want to save or ensure the target directory/folder is unique from the default location on the Mac ( /home/.ssh)

Run the ssh-keygen command at your shell and answer the prompts.  It will run interactively by default (prompting you for the appropriate information as needed).  The name of the Key Pair we are using for this tutorial is RSA-KEY and will be located under the directory /tmp/oci-stuff/.ssh

ssh-keygen
/tmp/oci-stuff/.ssh/RSA-KEY
***
***
ssh-keygen command on macOS Catalina with interactive prompts
ssh-keygen command on macOS Catalina with interactive prompts

Optionally you can enter all of the details in a single command line.  There are several parameters required at a minimum.  -t <key type>, -N <passphrase>, -b <number of bits in key>, -C <key name>, and -f <filename>

For Example:

ssh-keygen -t rsa -N “yourPassphraseGoesHere” -b 2048 -C “RSA-KEY” -f /tmp/oci-stuff/.ssh/RSA-KEY
ssh-keygen command on macOS Catalina with single command line
ssh-keygen command on macOS Catalina with single command line

Once the SSH Key Pair has been created, do a quick sanity check of it’s contents:

cat /tmp/oci-stuff/.ssh/RSA-KEY.pub
macOS Catalina results of generating a SSH Key Pair using ssh-keygen
macOS Catalina results of generating a SSH Key Pair using ssh-keygen

This completes the process to generate an SSH Key Pair on the Mac OS X for use with various Cloud Infrastructure providers such as Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud, etc..

PLEASE NOTE:

It’s important to keep this SSH Key pair safe including noting the path it’s stored in and also if you opted to include a passphrase, that should also be recorded safely.  The passphrase cannot be recovered if lost! 

I hope you found this post helpful.  As always any and all feedback is greatly appreciated and if you have further topics to suggest or any questions, please contact us and we’ll be happy to assist!

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Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Foundations 2020 Certified Associate Issued to Joe Malewicki, Jr.

  • Date: Jul 07, 2020
  • Article by: Elysha Daly
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Oracle EPM 11.2.2 Dropped

  • Date: Jun 30, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki
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Blog Details Page

  • Date: May 1, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki

So now that Oracle EPM 11.2.1 has been out for a while, most folks who were eagerly awaiting it have probably installed it, or at least installed components of it.  There are a lot of tips and tricks swirling throughout the interwebs, and I thought I’d add my own take.  

So, I decided to do a couple things different from my usual approach.  First, I decided to build my environments in increments, and actually start small.   Usually with these new versions I go for a big complex initial build and force myself to deal with the fallout.  

But this time I decided on a minimalist approach with a small cloud server for the Oracle DB and EPM suite.  I opted for Microsoft Azure, and while I had the option of using SQL Server 2016, I thought it might be too easy and I wanted a challenge.

For server sizing I opted for 4 VCPUs and 32 GB of RAM.  I was a little skeptical about the amount of RAM but figured I could always detune some of the JVMs or not start some of the services…it was just a lab build after all.

So, after provisioning my Windows 2019 image and getting connected, I installed Oracle DB and got things moving.  Following the install documentation, most things worked ‘as expected’.  The exception to this came with the RCU (Repository Creation Utility).  The RCU builds out the schemas that support the Java applications and requires SYS/SYSDBA credentials.

Filling in the basic information and clicking next, Oracle runs some basic pre-requisite checks when the following message was delivered:

  • RCU-6080:Global prerequisite check failed – The selected Oracle database is a multitenant container database (CDB).

I initially had no idea what this message meant, but some research led me to understand that when installing Oracle 12c, the database server now functions slightly differently than the last time I’d installed it (11g).  

Previously when you installed Oracle DB, one simply used the install specified database and then created tablespaces and schemas.  Once that bit was done, you took those schemas and told the various EPM components which one to use.  As it turns out, now we have multi-tenancy, and the RCU was not happy about it.

Resolving this error was interesting, but relatively simple.  When the Oracle DB Server is installed, it creates the CDB (Container Database), and prior to 12c all Oracle databases were non-CDBs.  However, the installer also offers to create a PDB (Pluggable Database)…and what is that you ask?

  • A PDB is a user-created entity that contains the data and code required for a specific set of features. For example, a PDB can support a specific application, such as a human resources or sales application.

Based on the above, I found that you can locate your PDB with the command:

  • select name from v$services;
    • This should list your Oracle databases and you can note the name of pdb one for future reference, as this is what you’ll feed to the RCU

I also found out that even having the correct DB was not enough, you also need to make it writable with the following command:

  • alter pluggable database all open;

With both of these complete, I could now run the RCU successfully (following the rest of the Install Guide directions).  

Of course, there was still more fun to be had when it came to updating the RCUSchema.properties file, but that’s a tale for our next installment.

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Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Foundations 2020 Certified Associate Issued to Joe Malewicki, Jr.

  • Date: Jul 07, 2020
  • Article by: Elysha Daly
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Oracle EPM 11.2.2 Dropped

  • Date: Jun 30, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki
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Blog Details Page

  • Date: June 2, 2019
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki

Since I recently lived through the fun of getting myself Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Architect Associate certified, I wanted to share a little information on how I prepared for the exam.  Please note, the opinions, words and views expressed in this article are ONLY a brain dump from my little techy head and there’s no guarantee that if you follow my training regime you will pass.  Or maybe you’ll kick my score out of the park by following these steps in which I would expect you to buy me a beer and send me a compliment!

So let’s go….

I wasn’t able to take an actual paid Oracle University class due to time limitations, but I did manage to attend a couple of the free live training sessions found here:

https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/register-for-training

You’ll find a lot of the same content they cover listed below in this article.  The biggest issue with these free sessions is availability and timing.  I didn’t have 3 months to wait around to cover the free sessions they offered.  That being said, I always live by the motto, “if it’s free it’s for me” so I still registered for them all and believe it or not, I’m still taking them.  It’s a great post certification exam way to keep your skills up!

To really get started on my training plan I first grabbed the published Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Architect Associate certification path study guide to find out what exactly Oracle’s cloud learning team suggests I learn on this OCI certification journey.  

https://learn.oracle.com/education/downloads/OracleCloudInfrastructurestudyguide.pdf

In this PDF (updated February 2019) you’ll find a great list of content as well as resources to help prep for the exam.  The most useful resources I found were the series of YouTube based videos:

https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/iaas/training  (if the link doesn’t work search YouTube for OCI Level 100 or 200)

I ran through all of the Level 100 videos before I even touched the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) console.  I found that seeing everything “once” before helped me to make a lot more efficient use of my practical time once I got my hands into it.

Here’s a list of the Level 100 Videos I watched in order and their times:

OCI Level 100 – Getting Started with OCI12
OCI Level 100 – Identify and Access Management44
OCI Level 100 – Virtual Cloud Network70
OCI Level 100 – Connectivity28
OCI Core 100 – Compute40
OCI Level 100 – Block Volume42
OCI Level 100 – File Storage44
OCI Level 100 – Object Storage38
OCI Level 100 – Load Balancing50
OCI Level 100 – Database38
OCI Level 100 Autonomous Database47
OCI Level 100 – Monitoring37
OCI Level 100 – Edge Services40

After spending 530 minutes/8+ hours (yes I timed it) on the treadmill staring at my iPad I decide to “get practical” and signed up for a Free 300 hour trial for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS – OCI) offering:

https://cloud.oracle.com

***NOTE***

You get one free trial so plan your practical hands-on time accordingly, so you don’t waste this great trial.

If you’re like me and want to truly dive into new technology, I’d suggest opening your wallet and spending a few bucks to access some fantastic training labs:

https://ocitraining.qloudable.com/provider/oracle

This is by no means a commercial (nobody seems to want to pay me for advice) – I don’t get anything for that referral, I just think their stuff was pretty cool. They have one free level 100 tutorial you can try out to see if you like their format.  The best part is, you don’t need an OCI trial or account to use these training labs.  You can pick a topic which makes sense for the lesson you are trying to learn and the OCI environment required is staged for you to use for that lesson.

The combination of the Level 100 videos, using the OCI trial for a solid week (I tried out almost every feature in there) and spending a few bucks on those training labs (the Oracle Virtual Cloud Network – VCN and Oracle Cloud Autonomous Database) all got me VERY comfortable with the OCI console.

I then decided it was time to see if this old guy still has it in him to learn.  I took a stab at the Oracle provided Practice Exam (if the link doesn’t work, just google it, you’ll find it).

http://oukc.oracle.com/static12/opn/login/?t=checkusercookies|r=-1|c=2164389233

I was able to answer successfully about 80% of the questions after the work I had put in so far.  (not bad although my high school son told me if he came home with an 80% I’d take away Xbox rights for a week – he’s right)

To kick it up a notch I went ahead and started watching the Level 200 series videos.  Those were “OK.”  I think the 100’s were a lot clearer on the presentation/learning angle.  The topics range widely for the OCI certification exam so for preparation, I chose to watch (and re-watch) the key areas from level 100 I felt needed some deeper explanation. 

Specifically, the following videos were VERY useful (hint hint hint) for the exam prep:

Level 200 – Virtual Cloud Network

Level 200 – Storage

Level 200 – Load Balancing

Level 200 – Terraform

Level 200 – Identity and Access Management

Level 200 – Database (pay close attention to the migration slides)

After going blurry and losing about 12 pounds from walking/hiking and jogging on my treadmill (bad knees ya know) I capped off my learning time by reading Oracle documentation and a series of whitepapers they provide.

So final prep and words of advice for the test……

The exam is NOT an easy one.  Yes, the passing score is only 65% but the questions are VERY specific so studying and getting hands on practice are essential for success.  Without divulging exam details (hey I had to earn it through hard work and a lot of time) I can offer up some words of advice – remember Oracle is a Database company – KNOW YOUR OCI DATABASE content.

Also – OCI like AWS or Azure is a Public cloud service/solution for the most part (with lots of added enterprise class technology to enhance that).  Keep in mind public cloud means connectivity requirements which means what????  Security which means what???? NETWORKING CONCEPTS so make sure Oracle’s Virtual Cloud Network concepts are engrained!

Outside of level 100’s 200’s and OCI hands on labs/trial/videos – the rest was just reading and practice.  

At this point I was feeling pretty good at what I’ve learned so I tried the  Oracle provided Practice Exam one last time (if the link doesn’t work, just google it, you’ll find it).

http://oukc.oracle.com/static12/opn/login/?t=checkusercookies|r=-1|c=2164389233

This time I was able to answer successfully 100% of the questions. (plenty of Xbox time for this guy!)

From there it was a matter of scheduling my exam test and going for it.  A word of advice – some test centers offer the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Architect Associate certification exam online but I would NOT do that.  The system is very picky, and it would stink to have an invalid test result due to a glitch.  I feel that going to a test center (although it’s a pain) will let you get your head straight with the material and take you out of your comfort zone and I’ve found that helps to hyper focus on the task in front of you. Just my suggestion but it seems to work for me.

As much as I wish I could say I bagged 100% on the exam – alas, I only scored an 83%.  Afterward I recalled several of the mistakes I made when I went back and reviewed, but that’s OK.  The practice I got prepping as well as the hands-on experience since then has been priceless and I know my clients are much better off that I endured this work and had to master this information.

Last food for thought…. Make sure you register for “Your Acclaim” so you can have bragging rights to all of your friends once you kick butt and pass the exam!!!:

https://www.youracclaim.com

I hope this article was helpful for anyone interested in the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Architect Associate certification exam preparation.  I would love any and all feedback, comments, questions you might have or to know your experiences!!!

Thank you and good luck!

I’ve tried to create a list of the URL’s you can find a lot of very relevant information for the OCI certification exam itself.  Please feel free to take a look and if you have some suggestions to add to the list, please let me know!

https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Tasks/managingbackendsets.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/API/SDKDocs/terraformconfig.htm
https://www.terraform.io/intro/getting-started/outputs.html
https://medium.com/@tigerbabu/oracle-cloud-infrastructure-associate-architect-notes-4495b25b24a4
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Tasks/managinglisteners.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Compute/Tasks/imageimportexport.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Block/Tasks/cloningavolume.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/database/faq
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Identity/Tasks/managingusers.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/whitepapers/best-practices-for-iam-on-oci.pdf
https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/edge/dns/faq
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/API/Concepts/cliconcepts.htm#services
https://www.terraform.io/docs/extend/writing-custom-providers.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Tasks/managingVCNs.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/GSG/Tasks/loadbalancing.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Tasks/managingcertificates.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/bare-metal-network/vcn/faq
https://cloud.oracle.com/networking/vcn/faq
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/General/Concepts/regions.htm#one
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/paas/database-dbaas-cloud/csdbi/backing.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Block/Concepts/blockvolumebackups.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/governance/identity/faq
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/whitepapers/deploying_custom_os_images.pdf
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/General/Concepts/identifiers.htm#two
https://www.terraform.io/docs/commands/plan.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Concepts/securitylists.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Compute/Tasks/terminatinginstance.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Tasks/managingIPsec.htm#Example
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Identity/Concepts/federation.htm
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/paas/database-dbaas-cloud/csdbi/monitor-and-manage-db.html
https://cloud.oracle.com/storage/object-storage/faq
https://cloud.oracle.com/storage/archive-storage/faq
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Tasks/NATgateway.htm
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/paas/database-dbaas-cloud/csdbi/dbaascli.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/API/SDKDocs/cliinstall.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Object/Concepts/objectstorageoverview.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Reference/lbpolicies.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Tasks/managingbackendservers.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/File/Concepts/filestorageoverview.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/storage/data-transfer/faq
https://cloud.oracle.com/storage/object-storage/features
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Compute/References/bestpracticescompute.htm
https://blogs.oracle.com/cloud-infrastructure/introducing-oracle-cloud-infrastructure-data-transferservice
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/migrating.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Tasks/editinghealthcheck.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/whitepapers/vcn-deployment-guide.pdf
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Identity/Concepts/policies.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Concepts/balanceoverview.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/whitepapers/best-practices-deploying-ha-architecture-oci.pdf
https://oracle-base.com/articles/misc/articles-misc
https://cloud.oracle.com/storage/block-volume/faq
https://www.oracle.com/webfolder/technetwork/tutorials/obe/cloud/ocis/load-balancer/loadbalancer.html
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/paas/autonomous-data-warehouse-cloud/user/manage-service.html#GUID-4861BA7F-F9FA-4909-8DC0-4F46AFF80706
https://cloud.oracle.com/fastconnect/peering-types
https://blogs.oracle.com/cloud-infrastructure/connect-private-instances-with-oracle-services-through-an-oracle-cloud-infrastructure-service-gateway
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/paas/autonomous-data-warehouse-cloud/user/load-data.html#GUID-1351807C-E3F7-4C6D-AF83-2AEEADE2F83E
https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/storage/file-storage/faq
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/whitepapers/oci_security.pdf
https://cloud.oracle.com/database/faq
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/pdf/gsg/OCI_Getting_Started.pdf
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Object/Tasks/managingbuckets.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Object/Tasks/usingmultipartuploads.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Concepts/fastconnectoverview.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/usingDG.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/adbmanaging.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/tools/oci-cli/latest/oci_cli_docs/cmdref/compute/instance/launch.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/adbcreating.htm
http://storageconference.us/2018/Presentations/Beauvais.pdf
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Tasks/managingDRGs.htm
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/iaas/storage-cloud/cssto/encrypting-objects.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/usingdataguard.htm
https://blogs.oracle.com/cloud-infrastructure/using-availibility-domains-and-fault-domains-to-improve-application-resiliency
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/launchingDB.htm

Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Foundations 2020 Certified Associate Issued to Joe Malewicki, Jr.

  • Date: Jul 07, 2020
  • Article by: Elysha Daly
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Oracle EPM 11.2.2 Dropped

  • Date: Jun 30, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki
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Blog Details Page

  • Date: May 22, 2019
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki

Since I recently lived through the fun of getting myself Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Architect Associate certified, I wanted to share a little information on how I prepared for the exam.  Please note, the opinions, words and views expressed in this article are ONLY a brain dump from my little techy head and there’s no guarantee that if you follow my training regime you will pass.  Or maybe you’ll kick my score out of the park by following these steps in which I would expect you to buy me a beer and send me a compliment!

So let’s go….

I wasn’t able to take an actual paid Oracle University class due to time limitations, but I did manage to attend a couple of the free live training sessions found here:

https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/register-for-training

You’ll find a lot of the same content they cover listed below in this article.  The biggest issue with these free sessions is availability and timing.  I didn’t have 3 months to wait around to cover the free sessions they offered.  That being said, I always live by the motto, “if it’s free it’s for me” so I still registered for them all and believe it or not, I’m still taking them.  It’s a great post certification exam way to keep your skills up!

To really get started on my training plan I first grabbed the published Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Architect Associate certification path study guide to find out what exactly Oracle’s cloud learning team suggests I learn on this OCI certification journey.  

https://learn.oracle.com/education/downloads/OracleCloudInfrastructurestudyguide.pdf

In this PDF (updated February 2019) you’ll find a great list of content as well as resources to help prep for the exam.  The most useful resources I found were the series of YouTube based videos:

https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/iaas/training  (if the link doesn’t work search YouTube for OCI Level 100 or 200)

I ran through all of the Level 100 videos before I even touched the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) console.  I found that seeing everything “once” before helped me to make a lot more efficient use of my practical time once I got my hands into it.

Here’s a list of the Level 100 Videos I watched in order and their times:

OCI Level 100 – Getting Started with OCI12
OCI Level 100 – Identify and Access Management44
OCI Level 100 – Virtual Cloud Network70
OCI Level 100 – Connectivity28
OCI Core 100 – Compute40
OCI Level 100 – Block Volume42
OCI Level 100 – File Storage44
OCI Level 100 – Object Storage38
OCI Level 100 – Load Balancing50
OCI Level 100 – Database38
OCI Level 100 Autonomous Database47
OCI Level 100 – Monitoring37
OCI Level 100 – Edge Services40

After spending 530 minutes/8+ hours (yes I timed it) on the treadmill staring at my iPad I decide to “get practical” and signed up for a Free 300 hour trial for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS – OCI) offering:

https://cloud.oracle.com

***NOTE***

You get one free trial so plan your practical hands-on time accordingly, so you don’t waste this great trial.

If you’re like me and want to truly dive into new technology, I’d suggest opening your wallet and spending a few bucks to access some fantastic training labs:

https://ocitraining.qloudable.com/provider/oracle

This is by no means a commercial (nobody seems to want to pay me for advice) – I don’t get anything for that referral, I just think their stuff was pretty cool. They have one free level 100 tutorial you can try out to see if you like their format.  The best part is, you don’t need an OCI trial or account to use these training labs.  You can pick a topic which makes sense for the lesson you are trying to learn and the OCI environment required is staged for you to use for that lesson.

The combination of the Level 100 videos, using the OCI trial for a solid week (I tried out almost every feature in there) and spending a few bucks on those training labs (the Oracle Virtual Cloud Network – VCN and Oracle Cloud Autonomous Database) all got me VERY comfortable with the OCI console.

I then decided it was time to see if this old guy still has it in him to learn.  I took a stab at the Oracle provided Practice Exam (if the link doesn’t work, just google it, you’ll find it).

http://oukc.oracle.com/static12/opn/login/?t=checkusercookies|r=-1|c=2164389233

I was able to answer successfully about 80% of the questions after the work I had put in so far.  (not bad although my high school son told me if he came home with an 80% I’d take away Xbox rights for a week – he’s right)

To kick it up a notch I went ahead and started watching the Level 200 series videos.  Those were “OK.”  I think the 100’s were a lot clearer on the presentation/learning angle.  The topics range widely for the OCI certification exam so for preparation, I chose to watch (and re-watch) the key areas from level 100 I felt needed some deeper explanation. 

Specifically, the following videos were VERY useful (hint hint hint) for the exam prep:

Level 200 – Virtual Cloud Network

Level 200 – Storage

Level 200 – Load Balancing

Level 200 – Terraform

Level 200 – Identity and Access Management

Level 200 – Database (pay close attention to the migration slides)

After going blurry and losing about 12 pounds from walking/hiking and jogging on my treadmill (bad knees ya know) I capped off my learning time by reading Oracle documentation and a series of whitepapers they provide.

So final prep and words of advice for the test……

The exam is NOT an easy one.  Yes, the passing score is only 65% but the questions are VERY specific so studying and getting hands on practice are essential for success.  Without divulging exam details (hey I had to earn it through hard work and a lot of time) I can offer up some words of advice – remember Oracle is a Database company – KNOW YOUR OCI DATABASE content.

Also – OCI like AWS or Azure is a Public cloud service/solution for the most part (with lots of added enterprise class technology to enhance that).  Keep in mind public cloud means connectivity requirements which means what????  Security which means what???? NETWORKING CONCEPTS so make sure Oracle’s Virtual Cloud Network concepts are engrained!

Outside of level 100’s 200’s and OCI hands on labs/trial/videos – the rest was just reading and practice.  

At this point I was feeling pretty good at what I’ve learned so I tried the  Oracle provided Practice Exam one last time (if the link doesn’t work, just google it, you’ll find it).

http://oukc.oracle.com/static12/opn/login/?t=checkusercookies|r=-1|c=2164389233

This time I was able to answer successfully 100% of the questions. (plenty of Xbox time for this guy!)

From there it was a matter of scheduling my exam test and going for it.  A word of advice – some test centers offer the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Architect Associate certification exam online but I would NOT do that.  The system is very picky, and it would stink to have an invalid test result due to a glitch.  I feel that going to a test center (although it’s a pain) will let you get your head straight with the material and take you out of your comfort zone and I’ve found that helps to hyper focus on the task in front of you. Just my suggestion but it seems to work for me.

As much as I wish I could say I bagged 100% on the exam – alas, I only scored an 83%.  Afterward I recalled several of the mistakes I made when I went back and reviewed, but that’s OK.  The practice I got prepping as well as the hands-on experience since then has been priceless and I know my clients are much better off that I endured this work and had to master this information.

Last food for thought…. Make sure you register for “Your Acclaim” so you can have bragging rights to all of your friends once you kick butt and pass the exam!!!:

https://www.youracclaim.com

I hope this article was helpful for anyone interested in the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Architect Associate certification exam preparation.  I would love any and all feedback, comments, questions you might have or to know your experiences!!!

Thank you and good luck!

I’ve tried to create a list of the URL’s you can find a lot of very relevant information for the OCI certification exam itself.  Please feel free to take a look and if you have some suggestions to add to the list, please let me know!

https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Tasks/managingbackendsets.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/API/SDKDocs/terraformconfig.htm
https://www.terraform.io/intro/getting-started/outputs.html
https://medium.com/@tigerbabu/oracle-cloud-infrastructure-associate-architect-notes-4495b25b24a4
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Tasks/managinglisteners.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Compute/Tasks/imageimportexport.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Block/Tasks/cloningavolume.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/database/faq
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Identity/Tasks/managingusers.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/whitepapers/best-practices-for-iam-on-oci.pdf
https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/edge/dns/faq
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/API/Concepts/cliconcepts.htm#services
https://www.terraform.io/docs/extend/writing-custom-providers.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Tasks/managingVCNs.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/GSG/Tasks/loadbalancing.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Tasks/managingcertificates.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/bare-metal-network/vcn/faq
https://cloud.oracle.com/networking/vcn/faq
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/General/Concepts/regions.htm#one
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/paas/database-dbaas-cloud/csdbi/backing.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Block/Concepts/blockvolumebackups.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/governance/identity/faq
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/whitepapers/deploying_custom_os_images.pdf
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/General/Concepts/identifiers.htm#two
https://www.terraform.io/docs/commands/plan.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Concepts/securitylists.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Compute/Tasks/terminatinginstance.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Tasks/managingIPsec.htm#Example
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Identity/Concepts/federation.htm
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/paas/database-dbaas-cloud/csdbi/monitor-and-manage-db.html
https://cloud.oracle.com/storage/object-storage/faq
https://cloud.oracle.com/storage/archive-storage/faq
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Tasks/NATgateway.htm
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/paas/database-dbaas-cloud/csdbi/dbaascli.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/API/SDKDocs/cliinstall.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Object/Concepts/objectstorageoverview.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Reference/lbpolicies.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Tasks/managingbackendservers.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/File/Concepts/filestorageoverview.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/storage/data-transfer/faq
https://cloud.oracle.com/storage/object-storage/features
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Compute/References/bestpracticescompute.htm
https://blogs.oracle.com/cloud-infrastructure/introducing-oracle-cloud-infrastructure-data-transferservice
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/migrating.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Tasks/editinghealthcheck.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/whitepapers/vcn-deployment-guide.pdf
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Identity/Concepts/policies.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Balance/Concepts/balanceoverview.htm
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/whitepapers/best-practices-deploying-ha-architecture-oci.pdf
https://oracle-base.com/articles/misc/articles-misc
https://cloud.oracle.com/storage/block-volume/faq
https://www.oracle.com/webfolder/technetwork/tutorials/obe/cloud/ocis/load-balancer/loadbalancer.html
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/paas/autonomous-data-warehouse-cloud/user/manage-service.html#GUID-4861BA7F-F9FA-4909-8DC0-4F46AFF80706
https://cloud.oracle.com/fastconnect/peering-types
https://blogs.oracle.com/cloud-infrastructure/connect-private-instances-with-oracle-services-through-an-oracle-cloud-infrastructure-service-gateway
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/paas/autonomous-data-warehouse-cloud/user/load-data.html#GUID-1351807C-E3F7-4C6D-AF83-2AEEADE2F83E
https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/storage/file-storage/faq
https://cloud.oracle.com/iaas/whitepapers/oci_security.pdf
https://cloud.oracle.com/database/faq
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/pdf/gsg/OCI_Getting_Started.pdf
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Object/Tasks/managingbuckets.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Object/Tasks/usingmultipartuploads.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Concepts/fastconnectoverview.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/usingDG.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/adbmanaging.htm
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/tools/oci-cli/latest/oci_cli_docs/cmdref/compute/instance/launch.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/adbcreating.htm
http://storageconference.us/2018/Presentations/Beauvais.pdf
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Network/Tasks/managingDRGs.htm
https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/iaas/storage-cloud/cssto/encrypting-objects.html
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/usingdataguard.htm
https://blogs.oracle.com/cloud-infrastructure/using-availibility-domains-and-fault-domains-to-improve-application-resiliency
https://docs.cloud.oracle.com/iaas/Content/Database/Tasks/launchingDB.htm

Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Foundations 2020 Certified Associate Issued to Joe Malewicki, Jr.

  • Date: Jul 07, 2020
  • Article by: Elysha Daly
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Oracle EPM 11.2.2 Dropped

  • Date: Jun 30, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki
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Blog Details Page

  • Date: October 21, 2016
  • Article by: Robert Barrett

When bad things happen and you have to start troubleshooting, it is important to know what version of software you are using.  Whether you or someone else is doing the work, knowing what version or even the patch level of your system, will be required.  Below we have listed a few programs and how to find their versions.

Microsoft Excel

First, go to your “Start” menu and open your Microsoft Excel program.

 

png1

 

Second, select the “File” tab and  choose “Help.”  You will find the versioning information to the right.

png2

 

If you are using Smart View the information you will need is under the SmartView tab.

First, from Excel select your Smart View tab.

Second, Choose the “Help” option and then go to “About(z)…”

png3

 

The Smart View version will then  be displayed for you.

png4

 

To find your Operating System information go to your “Start” menu and select “Computer.”

png5

 

Second, right click on your “Computer” and choose “Properties.”

png6

 

Here you will find which operating system you are running on as well as your computer’s name and other vital information.

png7

 

In order to see what version your various Hyperion products are at, you will need to log into Workspace.

Second, click on the “Tools” option and choose “About Oracle Enterprise Performance Management System Workspace, Fusion Edition.”

png8

 

Third, select “Show Details.”

png9

 

You will be able to scroll through the various Hyperion products and their given patch levels.

png10

We at iArch Solutions hope you found this blog helpful.  Is there a question you want answered in a blog?  Send us your questions, comments and feedback.

APPLICABLE VERSIONS: 11.1.2.0, 11.1.2.1, 11.1.2.2, 11.1.2.3, 11.1.2.4

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Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Foundations 2020 Certified Associate Issued to Joe Malewicki, Jr.

  • Date: Jul 07, 2020
  • Article by: Elysha Daly
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Oracle EPM 11.2.2 Dropped

  • Date: Jun 30, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki
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Blog Details Page

  • Date: October 10, 2016
  • Article by: Robert Barrett

Is your Hyperion Financial Management System running “slow?”  That’s good, because now you have a chance to “catch it” and maybe speed it up!!  If you have more than one HFM application server running against a Microsoft SQL Server backend for your database, then please follow these steps to either fix the issue or confirm that this is not causing the issue.

The standard procedure when using Microsoft SQL Server database as a repository for any Oracle Hyperion product is to run the following SQL query for all databases prior to configuring your software:

Set READ_COMMITTED_SNAPSHOT = ON
Set ALLOW_SNAPSHOT_ISOLATION = ON

This pre-requisite requirement can be found in the Oracle Enterprise Performance Management System Installation and Configuration Guide.

However, it has been recently discovered, that this database setting has potential negative performance impact on certain HFM Application tasks, such as consolidations.

Run the following SQL query against all existing HFM databases within your environment(s) to confirm the state of the current database setting.  If your results display a “1” or “on” then please proceed to our offered solution below.

select name, is_read_committed_snapshot_on, snapshot_isolation_state_desc from sys.databases

 

epm_hfm_pics

Solution:

First, confirm that all Oracle EPM Service Software has been stopped.

Second, if possible, perform a restart of the Microsoft SQL Server Windows service to clear any orphaned processes.

Third, perform a cold back up of your HFM database.  ***This is a critical step***

Last, you will run the following SQL query against the HFM database.

alter database <HFM_DB>
set allow_snapshot_isolation off;
alter database <HFM_DB>
set read_committed_snapshot off;

 

In our example we changed the <HFM_DB> within the SQL query to EPM_FM, the name of our Financial Management database.

pic03

Now you can go back and run this query again to confirm the change has taken hold:

select name, is_read_committed_snapshot_on, snapshot_isolation_state_desc from sys.databases

 

Please note the change in the EPM_FM state to “0” and “off.”

pic04

 

When this process is complete, please go ahead and restart your Oracle EPM Service Software.  We always suggest you perform your standard validation to confirm that your environment is still functioning properly.  While there is no guarantee of the amount of performance improvement, through our own testing, we were able to see a client’s Financial Management consolidation process reduced from over 2 hours to approximately 15 minutes.

We at iArch Solutions hope you found this blog helpful. Is there a question you want answered in a blog?  Send us your questions, comments and feedback.

APPLICABLE VERSIONS: 11.1.2.4

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Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Foundations 2020 Certified Associate Issued to Joe Malewicki, Jr.

  • Date: Jul 07, 2020
  • Article by: Elysha Daly
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Oracle EPM 11.2.2 Dropped

  • Date: Jun 30, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki
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Blog Details Page

  • Date: May 4, 2016
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki

After applying Analytics Provider Services Patch Set Update (PSU) 11.1.2.4.006 we can no longer perform an adhoc analysis to an Essbase application.  The following error is thrown inside of Microsoft Excel with the Smart View add-in:

Error:

—————————

Oracle Smart View for Office

—————————

com/essbase/services/olap/grid/EssGGridOption.setOptionSingleMbrPov(Ljava/lang/Boolean;)V

—————————

OK

—————————

Screen Shot of Error:

Pic1

 

To confirm if there is an issue with the Provider Services (APS) patch you can run a test to confirm the version details for the Provider Services JAPI:

http://:13080/aps/Test

The version of Analytic Provider Services should match the JAPI version.  Our test showed a discrepancy:

Analytic Provider Services – Release 11.1.2.4.006.003 , JAPI 11.1.2.3.4408

Pic2

This issue is being caused by the ess_japi.jar file being a “Read-Only” file. When the new patch was applied it could not update this file.

 

To correct the issue, use the following procedure:

 

Shut down ALL Oracle EPM/Hyperion services or processes.  If you don’t have a system wide stop/start script, check out our earlier post on creating this such item!  How To Create Microsoft Windows EPM/Hyperion Start and Stop Scripts

Once all services are down, locate and change the file system properties at the EssbaseJavaAPI folder level, right-click and deselect “Read-Only.”

Pic3

De-select “Read-only” and click “Apply.”

Pic4

Click “OK”

Pic5

Click “OK”

Pic6

Open an Administrator Windows command prompt (cmd.exe using right-click “Run as Administrator”).

Then you want to rollback the Analytic Provider Services (APS) Patch: 11.1.2.4.006:

For example:

opatch.bat rollback -id 22204266 -oh F:OracleMiddlewareEPMSystem11R1 -jdk F:OracleMiddlewarejdk160_35

Type “y” when prompted and press <enter>.

Pic8

Pic9

This would be an appropriate time to go back and confirm that the ess_japi.jar is no longer set to “Read-Only.”  If it is, re-apply the same steps noted above for changing the parent folder and all sub folders/items to be “non-read only.”

Open an Administrator Windows command prompt (cmd.exe using right-click “Run as Administrator”).

Re-apply the Analytic Provider Services (APS) Patch 11.1.2.4.006:

opatch.bat apply F:OracleMiddlewareEPMSystem11R1OPatch22204266 -oh F:OracleMiddlewareEPMSystem11R1 -jre F:OracleMiddlewarejdk160_35

Pic10

Type “y” and press <enter>.

Pic11

Pic12

Delete all of the contents of the tmp and cache directories for the APS server(s) under the WebLogic Domain.  Do NOT remove the tmp and cache folders themselves, just delete the contents.

Sample locations:

F:OracleMiddlewareuser_projectsdomainsEPMSystemserversAnalyticProviderServices0tmp

F:OracleMiddlewareuser_projectsdomainsEPMSystemserversAnalyticProviderServices0cache

Restart All Oracle EPM/Hyperion System services.

***NOTE***

The above procedures should be performed on ALL servers which are hosting Analytics Provider Services (APS) within the affected Oracle EPM /Hyperion System environment(s).

Test your Analytics Provider Services (APS) URL again:

http://:13080/aps/Test

The version of Analytic Provider Services should now match the JAPI version.

Analytic Provider Services – Release 11.1.2.4.006.003 , JAPI 11.1.2.4.006.003

Pic13

Re-test the Smart View connection and perform an adhoc connection to an Essbase application.  The error should no longer be present and the query should work.

Pic14

 

 

We at iArch Solutions hope you found this blog helpful. Is there a question you want answered in a blog? Send us your questions, comments and feedback.

 

APPLICABLE VERSIONS: 11.1.2.0, 11.1.2.1, 11.1.2.2, 11.1.2.3, 11.1.2.4

 

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Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Foundations 2020 Certified Associate Issued to Joe Malewicki, Jr.

  • Date: Jul 07, 2020
  • Article by: Elysha Daly
Read More

Oracle EPM 11.2.2 Dropped

  • Date: Jun 30, 2020
  • Article by: Joe Malewicki
Read More